Frequently Asked Questions

When should my child first see a dentist?

First visit by first birthday

What is the difference between a pediatric dentist and a family dentist?

Pediatric dentists are the pediatricians of dentistry. A pediatric dentist has two to three years of specialty training following dental school and limits his/her practice to treating children only. Pediatric dentists are primary and specialty oral care providers for infants and children through adolescence, including those with special health needs. Learn more

When should my child first see a dentist?

“First visit by first birthday” sums it up. Your child should visit a pediatric dentist six months after their first tooth erupts, but no later than their first birthday. This visit will establish a dental home for your child. Early examination and preventive care will protect your child’s smile now and in the future. Learn more

Why so early? What dental problems could a baby have?

The most important reason is to begin a thorough prevention program. Dental problems can begin early. A big concern is Early Childhood Caries (formerly known as baby bottle tooth decay or nursing caries). Once a child’s diet includes anything besides breastmilk, erupted teeth are at risk for decay. The earlier the dental visit, the better the chance of preventing dental problems. Children with healthy teeth chew food easily and smile with confidence. Start your child now on a lifetime of good dental habits.

When should I start cleaning my baby’s teeth?

The sooner the better! Starting at birth, clean your child’s gums with a soft infant toothbrush or cloth and water. As soon as the teeth begin to appear, start brushing twice daily using non-fluoridated toothpaste and a soft, age appropriate sized toothbrush. Learn more

Are baby teeth really that important to my child?

It is very important to maintain the health of the primary teeth. Neglected cavities can and frequently do lead to problems which affect developing permanent teeth. Primary teeth, or baby teeth are important for (1) proper chewing and eating, (2) providing space for the permanent teeth and guiding them into the correct position, and (3) permitting normal development of the jaw bones and muscles. Primary teeth also affect the development of speech and add to an attractive appearance. While the front 4 teeth last until 6-7 years of age, the back teeth (cuspids and molars) aren’t replaced until age 10-13. Learn more

Are baby teethe important?

How can I prevent tooth decay from nursing or using a bottle?

At will breastfeeding should be avoided after the first primary (baby) teeth begin to erupt and other sources of nutrition have been introduced. Children should not fall asleep with a bottle containing anything other than water. Drinking juice from a bottle should be avoided. Fruit juice should only be offered in a cup with meals or at snack time. Children should be weaned from the bottle at 12-14 months of age.

 How often should a child have dental X-ray films?

Since every child is unique, the need for dental Xray films varies from child to child. Films are taken only after reviewing your child’s medical and dental histories and when they are likely to yield information that a visual examination cannot. Xray films help detect cavities developing between the teeth . In general, children need Xrays more often than adults. Their mouths grow and change rapidly. They are also more susceptible than adults to tooth decay.

Why should X-ray films be taken if my child has never had a cavity?

Xray films detect much more than cavities. For example, Xrays may be needed to survey developing teeth, diagnose bone diseases, evaluate the results of an injury, or plan orthodontic treatment. Xrays allow dentists to diagnose and treat conditions that cannot be detected during a clinical examination. If dental problems are found and treated early, dental care is more comfortable and affordable.

Does Your Child Grind His Teeth At Night? (Bruxism)

Parents are often concerned about the nocturnal grinding of teeth (bruxism). Often, the first indication is the noise created by the child grinding on their teeth during sleep. Or, the parent may notice wear (teeth getting shorter) to the dentition. read more

Should I worry about thumb and finger sucking?

Sucking is a natural reflex and infants and young children may use thumbs, fingers, pacifiers and other objects on which to suck. It may make them feel secure and happy, or provide a sense of security at difficult periods. Since thumb sucking is relaxing, it may induce sleep. Learn more

 What Is Pulp Therapy?

The pulp of a tooth is the inner, central core of the tooth. The pulp contains nerves, blood vessels, connective tissue and reparative cells. The purpose of pulp therapy in Pediatric Dentistry is to maintain the vitality of the affected tooth (so the tooth is not lost).

Dental caries (cavities) and traumatic injury are the main reasons for a tooth to require pulp therapy. Pulp therapy is often referred to as a “nerve treatment”, “children’s root canal”, “pulpectomy” or “pulpotomy”. The two common forms of pulp therapy in children’s teeth are the pulpotomy and pulpectomy.

A pulpotomy removes the diseased pulp tissue within the crown portion of the tooth. Next, an agent is placed to prevent bacterial growth and to calm the remaining nerve tissue. This is followed by a final restoration (usually a stainless steel crown).

A pulpectomy is required when the entire pulp is involved (into the root canal(s) of the tooth). During this treatment, the diseased pulp tissue is completely removed from both the crown and root. The canals are cleansed, disinfected and, in the case of primary teeth, filled with a resorbable material. Then, a final restoration is placed. A permanent tooth would be filled with a non-resorbing material.

What Is The Best Time For Orthodontic Treatment?

Developing malocclusions, or bad bites, can be recognized as early as 2-3 years of age. Often, early steps can be taken to reduce the need for major orthodontic treatment at a later age.

Stage I – Early Treatment: This period of treatment encompasses ages 2 to 6 years. At this young age, we are concerned with underdeveloped dental arches, the premature loss of primary teeth, and harmful habits such as finger or thumb sucking. Treatment initiated in this stage of development is often very successful and many times, though not always, can eliminate the need for future orthodontic/orthopedic treatment.

Stage II – Mixed Dentition: This period covers the ages of 6 to 12 years, with the eruption of the permanent incisor (front) teeth and 6 year molars. Treatment concerns deal with jaw malrelationships and dental realignment problems. This is an excellent stage to start treatment, when indicated, as your child’s hard and soft tissues are usually very responsive to orthodontic or orthopedic forces.

Stage III – Adolescent Dentition: This stage deals with the permanent teeth and the development of the final bite relationship. Not sure if your child needs braces? Read Does my child need braces? by Dr Christy Jen DDS.

Adult Teeth Coming in Behind Baby Teeth

This is a very common occurrence with children, usually the result of a lower, primary (baby) tooth not falling out when the permanent tooth is coming in.  In most cases if the child starts wiggling the baby tooth, it will usually fall out on its own within two months. If it doesn’t, then contact your pediatric dentist, where they can easily remove the tooth.  The permanent tooth should then slide into the proper place.

CHILDREN'S ORAL CARE

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Testimonials About Anchorage Pediatric Dentistry

My son LOVES this dentist office, the staff and Dr. Darby are the BEST. I will not take my son to anyone else. They give my son the best care, and they truly love all that comes to them. Dr. Darby treats my son As if he was his son. They are all like family. My son love to go to all the receptionist and staff and give all hugs. The BEST care always! Thank you

Ruth W.

Dr Darby is the best

Our experience with this office has been amazing! All of the staff, Dr. Easte Warnick, and Dr. Darby are amazing with my daughter. The time, care and effort they put forth to make her comfortable and lessen the burden on us as parents is incredible. Education, billing, what to expect concerns were all addressed without being made to feel rushed. Dr. Easte Warnick went above and beyond from our first visit to the follow up after my daughter's procedure and it was an incredible blessing to know she cared. The follow up office care has been as wonderful as our initial visit. I truly can't thank them all enough with just words. The care is outstanding and the office manager was just as amazing as the doctors! My daughter refers to her work as her special jewelry and works extra hard to keep it sparkling!!

Tatum H.

Dr. Easte Warnick, and Dr. Darby are amazing
Childrens Dentist

At Anchorage Pediatric Dentistry, we provide comprehensive dental care for infants, children and adolescents. Our passion and the purpose of our practice, is to provide the best possible pediatric dental care through kindness, education, and excellent treatment.

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